What We Heard: Round 1 Public Engagement Summary / Q&A

In the first round of public outreach, the CYMPOengage site collected over 500 individual responses across four RTP Update specific engagement modules. Through this tremendous engagement from the local community, the CYMPO RTP project team has compiled these responses into common recurring themes. We encourage participants to look through the engagement summary slides above. Please share any additional questions or comments that you may have as this plan moves forward.

Comment Sort

Comentarios

Diana Austin's avatar

anonymous
Mayo 18, 2019 - 08:58

Public Transportation is a big need. We need buses that route throughout the quad cities. Meeting the needs of the elderly, young adult and those who cannot drive.

  • Like this comment 0
  • Dislike this comment 0
Diana Austin's avatar

anonymous
Mayo 18, 2019 - 08:58

Public Transportation is a big need. We need buses that route throughout the quad cities. Meeting the needs of the elderly, young adult and those who cannot drive.

  • Like this comment 0
  • Dislike this comment 0
FSM's avatar

FSM
Mayo 19, 2019 - 22:44

Barrier fences in high traffic areas that are known areas on major highways

  • Like this comment 0
  • Dislike this comment 0
Bolo Ty's avatar

Bolo Ty
Mayo 20, 2019 - 15:34

This makes sense, people are going to spend the most time walking and strolling through downtown, while any travel will be on major State Routes that connect elsewhere. Downtown should have a pedestrian only interface, see how outraged the retirees will get over that haha

  • Like this comment 0
  • Dislike this comment 0
Walt Anderson's avatar

anonymous
Mayo 22, 2019 - 09:38

I am very concerned about wildlife habitat fragmentation as the pace of development more and more restricts wildlife to small patches where population viability is questionable. Planning needs to assure continued population viability of multiple species. I strongly feel that construction needs to compensate by mitigation moneys to go toward habitat protection (for example, in Granite Dells). The same is true for our grassland species. If we split the grasslands into patches blocked by road barriers, we will lose our valued grassland wildlife. Moving wildlife (e.g., Pronghorns) is a poor substitute for keeping patches connected. We know how to do these things; we just need the will and the funding.

  • Like this comment 0
  • Dislike this comment 0
Karen Aikins's avatar

anonymous
Mayo 30, 2019 - 21:07

Creaing a fair trade of usable aesthetic Open space, keeping wildlife cooridrs open, keeping safe with new roads (bipasses) & new developments ought to be mandated to developers in return for the opportunity to develope in our region, as trade for the infrastructure, water rights & upkeep of sewers & roads etc. Especially as it is already so stipulated in our development plans & guidelines.

  • Like this comment 0
  • Dislike this comment 0
Russ's avatar

anonymous
Jun 7, 2019 - 10:34

Spouse Drive at Tranquil is a problem. Perhaps if the northbound right lane was a straight/right turn. And the northbound left lane was a left turn only it would be better. If Tranquil were widened a bit there it'd be even better.
Alternatively, a light there might work. Or one at Manley maybe.

  • Like this comment 0
  • Dislike this comment 0
Kitty's avatar
Jun 26, 2019 - 07:27

$750,000 per mile of wildlife fencing? It doesn't have to be built by wildlife specialists. I would think the fencing would be the most cost-effective. I'd like to know the reason for this outrageous number.

  • Like this comment 0
  • Dislike this comment 0